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LARRY IBRAHIM MOHAMMED

Larry Ibrahim Mohammed participates with the lecture Ending witch-hunts in Ghana – Historical lessons for contemporary challenges.

Colonial records in Ghana suggests that witchcraft beliefs was popular amongst many societies and yet there were no records of witchcamps.
How did witchcamps come about?
And what is the solution for the witch-hunts in Ghana?

Larry Ibrahim Mohammed is currently based at the University in Tromsø and is fighting an ongoing battle to raise awareness about the witchcamps in his home country Ghana.

Larry Ibrahim Mohammed grew up in Nima-441, a suburb of Accra in Ghana. He is currently a PhD Research Fellow of Comparative Indigenous Studies at UiT- The Arctic University of Norway, where he investigates the nexus between indigenous peoples’ self-determination and various extractive activities in Norway and Canada.

Larrys Master of Philosopy thesis: BETWEEN ALIENATION AND BELONGING IN NORTHERN GHANA: The voices of the women in the Gambaga 'witchcamp'. Thesis Larry Ibrahim Mohammed, UIT.

Larry’s research work: BETWEEN ALIENATION AND BELONGING IN NORTHERN GHANA: The voices of the women in the Gambaga ‘witchcamp’ (uit.no) was awarded the Åse Hiorth Lerviks prize for the best master thesis with a gender theoretical perspective in 2021.
He has since delivered several lectures on different aspects of his research on the Gambaga witchcamp. Larry Ibrahim sees himself as a Global Citizen who believes in working to make the world a better place.

Larry has participated as a delegate in two Youth Assemblies at the United Nations in New York and volunteered at the 12th Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP) in Geneva.